Floral Motifs on Early Chintz
Ferraria crispa - Starfish Iris
Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris), photo by Max Antheunisse
Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris) from Private Collection of Paula Cochrane, Chintz Quilt Back, no date
Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris) (published as Ferraria obtusifolia) from Robert Sweet, The British Flower Garden, vol. 2, plate 148, 1825-1827 
Common Names: Starfish Iris, Curled Ferraria, Black Flag, Starfish Lily
 
Description: Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris) is a member of the Iris Family (Iridaceae). The Hortus Kewensis, ed. 2, vol. 4 recorded this native of the Cape of Good Hope was introduced into cultivation in Britain in 1755. 

Quilts with this Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris) motif: 
  • Private Collection of Paula Cochrane, Chintz Quilt Back, no date
  • Ardis and Robert James Collection,  International Quilt Museum, Album Quilt Made by Marie M. Fish and Emma Fish, Object Number 2005.053.0003, Chintz Applique: from Imitation to Icon, Plate 14, dated 1843 
  • Maryland Historical Society, Chintz Appliqued Quilt Made by Johanna Montell,  Object Number 1955.8.1, The Baltimore Album Quilt Tradition, p. 57, c.1834

Chintz with this Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris) motif: 
  • None known at this time


                                      Additional Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris) Motifs
Two Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris) illustrations from the Daughters of the American Revolution Museum, Markey Garnhart Quilt, c. 1830-1840
Quilts with this Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris)* motif: 
 
  • Daughters of the American Revolution Museum, Markey Garnhart Quilt, Object Number L.91.355, c. 1830-1840
  • Virginia Quilt Museum, Jane Weakley Leche Chintz Center Medallion Quilt, Object Number 1991.004.001, c. 1825  

Chintz with this Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris)* motif: 
 
  • None known at this time


*This chintz illustration is tentatively identified as Ferraria crispa (Starfish Iris) because the leaves associated with it are not those of the plant and one of the flowers illustrated appears to have only five instead of the standard six petals.  However the flower itself is extremely like that of the starfish iris.  It is likely the chintz designer responsible for the illustration was neither a botanical illustrator nor familiar with the actual plant but was working from drawings of Ferraria crispa.





   ©  Updated 9/6/2020     Author: Terry Terrell